Monday, May 25, 2015

Autocad Interface

Autocad Interface


Cooling down after the SF VR Hackathon

Posted: 25 May 2015 09:21 AM PDT

The 2nd VR Hackathon, which took place in San Francisco over the weekend, was an absolute blast. It was held at Galvanize, a co-working space about a 15-minute walk from our 1 Market Street office. The venue was great: it...

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Novidades GraphicSpeak

Novidades GraphicSpeak


The Archipelago of Things

Posted: 23 May 2015 03:04 PM PDT

We tend to think of the Internet of Things as a vast network that is knitting itself together as devices and computers connect to each other. But rather than a conspiracy of connected things; we’re more likely to see different networks of different things and most of them will do us more good than harm.  The [...]

Friday, May 22, 2015

Autocad Interface

Autocad Interface


Viewing 50+ design software formats from a web-page

Posted: 21 May 2015 11:10 PM PDT

This is very cool. As Stephen Preston has reported, over on the Cloud & Mobile DevBlog, the A360 team has delivered a widget that can be embedded in web-pages and views design files – including DWG files saved from AutoCAD,...

Thursday, May 21, 2015

“3DEXPERIENCE Speakers Reveal Accelerated Korea BIM Momentum” plus 1 more

“3DEXPERIENCE Speakers Reveal Accelerated Korea BIM Momentum” plus 1 more


3DEXPERIENCE Speakers Reveal Accelerated Korea BIM Momentum

Posted: 21 May 2015 05:00 AM PDT

 

Global adoption of BIM is proceeding with great momentum, and within Asia many are rapidly adopting BIM practices. Korea is one country leading the way with BIM adoption, with dramatic growth year over year.

Dassault Systèmes recently made speeches at two events focused on driving adoption of BIM in Korea. Building on the strong interest in the region, the company delivered these two talks on BIM.

Digital Tools for Sustainable Cities

Ingeborg Rocker, Vice President, GEOVIA 3DEXPERIENCity | Globe, Dassault Systèmes, presented "3DEXPERIENCITY" at buildSMART Forum 2015 Seoul, Korea on April 16.

With a soaring global population, vast numbers of people face living in cities that are decades or centuries old, built for much smaller populations with very different needs. This puts our environment at risk by wasting resources such as land, water, and energy, and makes cities harder to manage logistically.

A diverse range of disciplines are helping to solve these challenges, aided by a suite of digital tools. These tools allow scientists and city planners to see and explore the futures we are creating and their effects on their inhabitants and the planet as a whole.

Dassault Systèmes' 3DEXPERIENCity | Geosphere project aims to create holistic, virtual models that enable urban planners to digitally study and test ideas. This will allow them to consider the impact urbanization has both within the invisible boundaries of their city.

This approach could lead to our reimagining of the entire discipline of architecture—With a focus not just on the resulting structure but also the impact a building will have on the entire planet and its resources.

Tweet: See how digital tools are leading to sustainable cities @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC @3dsEXALEAD #AEC #BIM http://ctt.ec/0a43N+Click to tweet: “See how digital
tools are leading to sustainable cities”

 

BIM's Evolution to Building Lifecycle Management

Dongkeun Jang, Business Experience Consultant, 3DS Value Solutions, Korea, delivered a speech at the buildSMART Forum 2015 on April 16 and the 3DEXPERIENCE FORUM Korea on April 29.

Dongkeun Jang, Business Experience Consultant, 3DS Value Solutions, Korea

Industrialization techniques have been commonly used in manufacturing industries for decades, and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) has also been widely utilized. Now the use of Industrialized Construction is expanding in the Architecture, Engineering & Construction industry to help improve planning, design, construction, and assembly.

The benefits of this include increased sustainability, optimized operations, lower costs, and greater safety.

Tweet: optimized operations + sustainability + lower costs + greater safety = Industrialized Construction @Dassault3DS #AEC http://ctt.ec/Yde6H+Click to tweet: “optimized operations + sustainability +
lower costs + greater safety = Industrialized Construction”

With the growing adoption of BIM, companies can further benefit by implementing a Building Lifecycle Management (BLM) system. BLM puts into practice a BIM Level 3 approach that enables a highly efficient extended collaboration model based on PLM and manufacturing industry best practices.

 

To set the stage for true BLM, intuitive 3D design helps owners and architects communicate to confirm design directions and articulate design intentions.

It also builds a bridge to construction partners. 4D Virtual construction planning enables VDC mangers to evaluate better resource assignment and plan more efficient construction sequences.

EXALEAD OnePart helps owners and facility managers access specific facility information, whenever they want. Dongkeun demonstrated how projects can be managed by the 3DEXERIENCE Platform:

  • Segregated work break-down structures articulate project configurations
  • Project members can access dashboards of the latest information and project status
  • All communication is shared, communicated and recorded through the 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform

Dassault Systèmes 3DEXPERIENCE® platform applications can be part of an integrated extended collaboration process, bringing together all project design and delivery elements for more productive projects.

 

Tweet: #3DEXPERIENCE Speakers Reveal Accelerated Korea #BIM Momentum @Dassault3DS @3DSAEC @3dsEXALEAD #AEC http://ctt.ec/u4qi1+Click to tweet this article

 

Akio Moriwaki

Akio Moriwaki
Dassault Systèmes' head of global marketing for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry, Mr. Moriwaki led the launch of the groundbreaking Lean Construction Solution Experience and is a member of buildingSMART.


Related Resources:

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction

End-To-End Collaboration Enabled by BIM Level 3

Game-changing graphene: the amazing properties of a single-atom layer of carbon

Posted: 20 May 2015 04:59 AM PDT

Written by Catherine Bolgar

 

Step aside, silicon. There's a new substance that promises to revolutionize medicine, industry, water treatment, electronics and much more. That substance is graphene—a single-atom-thick layer of carbon, a millionth of the width of a human hair.Graphene1

The world's first two-dimensional material, graphene is potentially plentiful (carbon being the sixth most abundant element in the universe) and cheap. And it possesses amazing qualities and potential uses:

It's transparent, but conducts electricity and heat. Most good conductors are metals such as copper, which is opaque and quick to heat when electricity passes through. But they are prone to hot spots, which form around defects and cause electronic devices to fail. Graphene, by contrast, transfers heat efficiently. "It's a good alternative to copper," says Nai-Chang Yeh, professor of physics at California Institute of Technology. Indeed, electronic equipment may in future use graphene-coated copper interconnections to prevent overheating or wear and tear.

It's light and flexible, but 200 time stronger than steel. The carbon-to-carbon bond is very strong, says Rahul Nair, Royal Society fellow at the University of Manchester. In addition, graphene's carbon atoms are arranged in a tight, uniform honeycomb structure, which is able to bear loads and resist tearing. A membrane of graphene could withstand strong force without breaking, says Dr. Yeh. It may someday be used in aerospace, transportation, construction and defense.

Graphene_2683650b

It's a superlubricant. "If you take one piece of flawless graphene and put it on top of another, and slide one against the other, there's almost no friction," says Dr. Yeh. Coating machines parts with graphene could minimize unwanted friction, providing industry with countless applications.

It's impermeable…  Graphene's honeycomb structure is too tight for any molecules to squeeze through. "If you have graphene on metal, it's perfect protection, because other molecules in the air cannot penetrate that honeycomb hole," says Dr. Yeh. Indeed, Dr. Nair has dissolved graphene oxide in water to create a paint-like film that can protect any surface from corrosion. This graphene paint could be used by the oil and gas industry to protect equipment against saltwater, or by pharmaceutical and food packaging firms to block out oxygen and moisture, thereby extending their products' shelf life, says Dr. Nair.

…but can also be permeable. A single-micrometer-thick film containing thousands of layers of graphene oxide has nanosize capillaries between its layers, which expand when exposed to water. However, those capillaries don't expand when exposed to other substances. This is unusual because a water molecule is bigger than a helium or hydrogen molecule. However, water behaves differently when it's within the confined space of a nanometer, moving rapidly through the graphene oxide nanocapillary. By contrast, salt that is dissolved in the water is blocked. One use for this, says Dr. Nair, could be water or molecular filtration.

It's a chemical contradiction. A sheet of graphene is inert, but its edges are chemically reactive, says Dr. Yeh. A little graphene flake has a large perimeter relative to its area, allowing for more reaction. These flakes could be used to remove toxins from water.

It can be magnetic.  The zigzag-shaped edges of graphene have magnetic properties.f08f1905-624f-4530-846a-ddb2e635fac7-1422539141242"People imagine that you will be able to use graphene sheets as a magnet that can pick up iron at room temperature," explains Dr. Yeh. That something all-carbon can be magnetic is "amazing," she adds. Coupled with its electric conductivity, graphene's magnetic properties may open up all sorts of applications in spintronics and semiconductors.

Graphene's potential may be extraordinary, but how easy is it to create? It was first isolated in 2004 at Manchester University by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov who won the 2010 physics Nobel Prize for their work. They arrived at graphene by using adhesive tape to peel off ever-thinner layers from graphite, a process subject to continual improvement. In one common method, copper is heated to 1,000 degrees Celsius, near its melting point. Methane gas, comprising carbon and hydrogen molecules, is then added, and the copper rips off the bond between the two molecules, dissolving the carbon into the copper and letting the carbon "grow" on the surface, Dr. Yeh explains. The result is a sheet of graphene.

David Boyd and Wei-Hsiang Lin, working with Dr. Yeh at Caltech, however, found that what counts most is not heat but clean copper.  Copper oxidizes quickly in air and so has a thin layer of carbon oxide on its surface. They use hydrogen plasma, which has "gas radicals that behave like erasers and clean up the surface of the copper," Dr. Yeh explains. The process allows graphene to grow in five minutes at room temperature.

Most importantly, this method could be scaled up to produce industrial amounts of high-quality graphene—a huge step towards realizing its true potential.

Catherine Bolgar is a former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Europe. 

For more from Catherine Bolgar, contributors from the Economist Intelligence Unit along with industry experts, join the Future Realities discussion.

cadcamstuff.com

cadcamstuff.com


How to Tell if Nastran Simulation is For You

Posted: 20 May 2015 06:38 PM PDT

Does it make sense to stuff more power into your existing CAD tool? Most people will answer yes if it will make their design life easier.
Autodesk Nastran
Take Autodesk’s Nastran Simulation software that runs inside Inventor and SolidWorks. You get the most trusted industry simulation brain right inside two of the most powerful CAD packages. If your designs live outside a box of bubble wrap, Nastran can save you from re-designs caused by product failure in the field. You can, with a few mouse clicks, get a picture of how your designs react to things like temperature, loads, twisting and everyday usage. It’s much better than the old trick of over-designing: beef up material, and then take a hit on cost and weight.

The fear most people have is learning a new piece of software. I have to admit that I was a little scared when asked to learn simulation. You are not going to find any Ph.Ds in my family tree. Lucky for me and other former C-grade students, the simulation software is in many ways easier than CAD software you are using today. You are really just following the same dance steps every time. Pick material, how everything is being assembled, and where the forces are applied.
Check out this great video where my friend, Jim Byrne, gives an excellent example of the power of Nastran In-CAD.

Link

Novidades GraphicSpeak

Novidades GraphicSpeak


AMD GPU powers new 15-inch Apple MacBook Pro

Posted: 20 May 2015 03:48 PM PDT

Apple Watch haptic feedback, big fast SSD, and a real GPU. If you do video editing in Final Cut Pro X, or rendering of 3D images in pro graphics apps, Apple feels your pain and has updated the popular 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display. The new MacBook comes with a new Force Touch trackpad, faster [...]

The Foundry has a new majority owner

Posted: 20 May 2015 02:05 PM PDT

London private equity firm HgCapital pays $312 million to add The Foundry to its Technology, Media & Telecommunications group.  The Foundry, best known for its creative media products Modo and Nuke, has a new majority owner. London private equity firm HgCapital has paid £200 million ($312 million) to take over majority ownership from The Carlyle [...]

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Autocad Interface

Autocad Interface


An interesting visit to the SVVR exhibition hall

Posted: 20 May 2015 09:31 AM PDT

Yesterday I went along with two fellow Autodeskers, Lars and Oleg, to the Silicon Valley Virtual Reality conference at the San Jose Convention Center. As we were only attending the second day – we all flew in on Monday –...

Novidades GraphicSpeak

Novidades GraphicSpeak


Autodesk posts solid Q1 despite strong US Dollar

Posted: 19 May 2015 04:30 PM PDT

Cash flow and net profit were down; AEC remains strong. By Randall S. Newton Autodesk (NASDAQ: ADSK) reported a solid first quarter for fiscal 2016, despite lowered sales due to the strong US Dollar and the continued transition from perpetual licenses to subscriptions. Revenue was $647 million, up 9% compared to 1Q15, and 13% on [...]

Moore’s Law turns 50; Gordon Moore worries that US is losing its edge

Posted: 19 May 2015 01:29 PM PDT

Intel celebrates the semi-centennial of Moore's Law with events highlighting the work of the Gordon and Betty Moore foundation. Moore says he's been surprised by how well his prediction has held up over the years, but he's disappointed that the US seems to be losing interest in investing in pure research.

Boy Scouts of America introduces Animation merit badge

Posted: 19 May 2015 10:06 AM PDT

New merit badge will be the first delivered to scouts via both print and digital publishing. Keeping up with contemporary trends in the arts and sciences, The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is launching a new merit badge in animation. Created and developed in consultation with industry experts, the animation merit badge is the 136th addition [...]

Arnold renderer now available for Cinema 4D

Posted: 19 May 2015 09:09 AM PDT

The new bridge makes the popular renderer available inside the C4D interface. Solid Angle has released connector software that allows its popular Arnold ray tracing renderer work inside 3D modeling and animation software Maxon Cinema 4D (C4DtoA). Arnold is an advanced Monte Carlo ray tracing renderer purpose-built for feature-length animation and visual effects. Originally co-developed [...]

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Autodesk Inventor Suporte

Autodesk Inventor Suporte


Rotated Excel text is corrupted in PDF and DWF export [Inventor 2014 & 2016]

Posted: 19 May 2015 05:41 AM PDT

Please, find in the link below more details and possible workarounds for this regression introduced by the with "Update 1 for Inventor 2016" and "Update 6 for Inventor 2014 Service Pack 2"

http://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/inventor-products/troubleshooting/caas/sfdcarticles/sfdcarticles/Rotated-Excel-text-is-corrupted-in-PDF-and-DWF-export-Inventor-2014-2016.html

The issue will be addressed in the next Updates for the products.

Novidades GraphicSpeak

Novidades GraphicSpeak


Bentley reports $625 million revenue for 2014

Posted: 18 May 2015 12:12 PM PDT

The privately held AEC software firm offers annual insight into operations. Compared to 2013 Bentley has lost ground to Autodesk. Bentley Systems today reported selected information from its 2014 revenue and operations results. Total 2014 revenue of $625 million is up 7% from 2013 revenues. Net income was not disclosed. As a private company, Bentley [...]

Monday, May 18, 2015

“Top 10 Tips for a Successful PLM Implementation” plus 1 more

“Top 10 Tips for a Successful PLM Implementation” plus 1 more


Top 10 Tips for a Successful PLM Implementation

Posted: 18 May 2015 07:00 PM PDT

What every company should consider to ensure a successful PLM implementation

After hundreds of successful PLM implementations, Dassault Systèmes Industry Services (DSIS) has developed the methodologies and best practices that ensure quick, high levels of return on its customers' investments.

Here is their Top 10 list for a world-class PLM implementation:3DS_2014_IS_ConsultingServices_150_150

  1. Involve a true PLM expert early to assess your PLM maturity and gain efficiency on your processes, define an accurate vision, and focus your company's business goals and initiatives for a targeted return. A DS PLM expert who has been involved in your project from the outset will understand your goals and priorities, allowing faster issue resolution with better results. Engaging someone only after you discover issues creates delays and delivers sub-optimal results.
  2. Assess IT infrastructure readiness. Is it robust enough? Is it scalable? For a large Version 6 implementation, planning for hardware performance, capacity and scalability is key to success. Form a dedicated infrastructure team early to analyze target topography, distributions, loads, number of users, etc.; assess hardware needs; and identify performance bottlenecks. Analyzing the legacy system landscape and planning in advance for data migrations is crucial.3DS_2014_IS_Deployment Services_150_150
  3. Document all legacy business requirements. An implementation assessment with PLM experts and architects will help you understand how solution capabilities align with existing business processes and requirements. Documenting use cases and scenarios defines what will be supported and what is out of scope, ensuring goals are understood and met while minimizing late-cycle changes that cause delays and cost overruns.
  4. Establish a detailed governance plan that defines responsibilities and interfaces. A well-orchestrated governance plan ensures implementation timelines remain realistic and goals are achieved. By defining the customer's and vendor/vendors' responsibilities in advance and how interfaces between those responsibilities will be managed, you'll avoid conflicts that create delays.
  5. Evaluate the solution/business interface and process redesign. Customizing PLM to match existing processes complicates updates and 3DS_2014_IS_Engineering Services_150_150integrations for years to come. Instead, focus on configuring the solution to fully tap its collaborative power. Remember: This is your best opportunity to redesign your processes to streamline work, remove waste and non-value added activities, and accelerate innovation.
  6. Plan for how to import/translate legacy data. Data migration is an extremely important part of any enterprise implementation. Understanding legacy systems and planning data migration is critical to implementation success.
  7. Build enough flex time into the schedule. Aggressive timelines are a fact of business today, but a too-aggressive schedule is a recipe for failure. Realistically identify project risks, then build adequate buffers into the schedule to accommodate unexpected issues and allow for adequate testing before go-live.
  8. Make extensive use of business cases and test steps; involve testers early and often. Plan enough hands-on system-test time to truly understand the scope and limitations. Define a test strategy that includes functional unit testing and integration and regression testing. Build a proper QA testing phase into the implementation timeline, and allow time to address any identified issues.3DS_2014_IS_Enablement Services_150_150
  9. Assess staff readiness early to plan support and training. Timing is everything. Train too early and users forget what they learn before they can use it. Train too late and adoption lags. Test knowledge levels to ensure proficiency, and retrain as needed. Don't assume your users will automatically know how to use the new system; even small changes can lead to big frustrations when the user cannot use the new functionality.
  10. Provide for production service/support. Implementation doesn’t end at go-live. Post-launch service and support ensures implementation goals and expectations are fully met as the number of users and quantity of data increases.

Developing and executing a deliberate implementation ensures you achieve the full value of the solution specific to your industry and business. 3DS Industry Services, in close collaboration with our ecosystem of regional and global services partners, can help customers define and launch their projects on the right trajectory to hit their targets for value, schedule and cost.

Smart clothing moves beyond sportswear sensors

Posted: 15 May 2015 01:03 PM PDT

Plexus-Morphing-Smart-Shirt-2

Clever clothing is moving beyond sensor-laden sportswear, adding capabilities that keep us cool, or warm, and improve our health; smart clothes might one day even make us invisible. Consider the following possibilities.

Cool under fire: Past clothing innovations, such as Kevlar, have greatly enhanced personal safety, for example, by improving bulletproof vests. But being impermeable, such vests also keep out air and trap in the wearer's sweat. It is a problem that researchers at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA) have tried to solve by developing a smart protective vest with an integrated cooling system using "Coolpad" technology originally designed for medical uses.coolpadvest-2

The Coolpad consists of two breathable membranes and a thin hydrophilic textile from which the added water is evaporated for cooling. An active cooling mechanism consists of a Coolpad and a ventilation system based on a spacer fabric (a three dimensional knitted fabric) to guide the air. A tiny fan, similar to that in a computer, pumps air through the spacer fabric, which in turn guides the air through the inside of the vest, increasing evaporation and cooling the wearer, Martin Camenzind, an EMPA electronic engineer, explains. A small water reservoir creates a mist in the fabric channels and, along with the perspiration, helps cool the wearer.

The drop in temperature varies according to how the Coolpad vest is worn. Sometimes a police officer will want to display his or her bulletproof vest, other times to hide it. When worn close to the skin, over a T-shirt, it can reduce body temperature by four to six degrees Celsius, says Mr. Camenzind. "You would feel even smaller temperature changes than that," he adds. Furthermore, the active cooling system vest weighs about one kilogram, compared with the nearly 20 kilograms of equipment—including radio, gun, flashlight and more—that police officers regularly carry.

Hot fashion: At the other end of the thermometer, nanowire clothing could keep us all warm. Stanford University researchers have developed metallic nanowire-coated fabrics that reflect body heat back to the wearer, augmented by Joule heating in which an electric current releases heat. The clothing is also breathable, so the wearer stays comfortable. One benefit of the technology lies in not having to heat a whole house for its inhabitants to stay warm.

Walk like a robot: In another remarkable development, a Bristol University research team is developing soft-robotic clothing, such as smart trousers that support wearers as they walk or climb stairs, helping to prevent falls. Wearable robotics, especially for the elderly, might be more efficient than bulky walking aids or stair lifts, and more comfortable than braces that can restrict blood circulation.

Healthy fabrics: Other smart fabrics, being developed at the University of Laval in Quebec, can monitor and wirelessly transmit a wearer's biomedical information. Such fabrics can provide a minimally invasive way to monitor chronic diseases, glucose levels, heart rhythm, brain activity, movement or location.

Clothes hide the man: In the distant future, scientists may be able to develop an "invisibility cloak," using metamaterials—materials with properties not found in nature. Metamaterials could be used for better imaging, for visual prosthetics such as contact lenses, or for sensors. Metamaterials might also be used to create fabric with an interesting, colorful pattern that can change an object's image, including its color, says Andrea Di Falco, lecturer in nano-photonics at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Researchers there are developing Metaflex, a flexible metamaterial with electromagnetic properties.

invisible-cloak

Metamaterials often consist of metal particles smaller than light waves. To make something invisible, a metamaterial must keep light from interacting with the material itself, Dr. Di Falco explains. "If you hide the object with a cloak but you see the cloak, you haven't done the job. You have to hide the object and hide the cloak itself."

Researchers are therefore experimenting with ways to bend or alter light in order to hide objects. But each object needs its own unique cloak, making it feasible on a small scale but impractical for bigger objects such as people, says Dr. Di Falco. "Cloaking today is possible provided you accept some limitations," he says. "Will we ever be able to have a Harry Potter cloak? It's possible, but it's very, very far off."

Autocad Interface

Autocad Interface


VRing in SF

Posted: 18 May 2015 01:58 AM PDT

I'm on the train to Zurich airport, where I'll hop on the direct flight to San Francisco. This evening I'm staying in San Jose, as tomorrow I'll be visiting the SVVR 2015 expo hall to do some research on the...

Saturday, May 16, 2015

Novidades GraphicSpeak

Novidades GraphicSpeak


GPU shipments down in first quarter

Posted: 15 May 2015 09:00 AM PDT

All three major vendors of graphics processors saw declining sales except in their notebook models. Shipments of graphics processors (GPUs) followed the general PC market during the first quarter of 2015, with lower sales. But GPUs for notebooks bucked the trend, says Jon Peddie Research (JPR) in its GPU market update for the first quarter [...]

Create a trailer for Siggraph

Posted: 15 May 2015 08:17 AM PDT

A new contest for students seeks "imagination to tell a unique story" about Siggraph 2015 The Siggraph Education Committee is looking for the next great team of computer graphics artists to create a film-style trailer (preview) for Siggraph 2015. The Siggraph Trailer Contest draws inspiration from a similar contest run by the FMX conference. The [...]

Friday, May 15, 2015

Autocad Interface

Autocad Interface


Creating a rectangular jigsaw puzzle with specific dimensions inside AutoCAD using .NET

Posted: 15 May 2015 09:38 AM PDT

Following on from the last post, where we saw an outline for this series of posts on AutoCAD I/O, today's post adds a command to our jigsaw application that creates the geometry for a jigsaw puzzle of a specified size...

Novidades GraphicSpeak

Novidades GraphicSpeak


Lightmap HDR Light Studio update adds 80 features

Posted: 14 May 2015 10:49 AM PDT

A new user interface and new preview renderer enhance this "click to render" system. Lightmap is now shipping a major update to its "click to render" lighting software HDR Light Studio. Version 5 features an overhaul of the user interface, support for new 3D formats, and a new preview renderer. HDR Light Studio is designed [...]

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Spotlight on 3-im: Bringing a World View of BIM to Italy

Spotlight on 3-im: Bringing a World View of BIM to Italy


Spotlight on 3-im: Bringing a World View of BIM to Italy

Posted: 14 May 2015 05:00 AM PDT

 

Edmondo Occhipinti founder and Director of 3-im

In some ways Edmondo Occhipinti, founder and director of BIM consultancy 3-im, is starting from the ground up—again.

Occhipinti spent more than eight years with Gehry Technologies, working from his role as a consultant to ultimately manager of the company's European and South American divisions.

During that time, he grew from an individual with strong technical knowledge of 3D technologies to a manager who taught others how to apply these tools.

Now, in his new role with 3-im, Occhipinti is teaching a whole new group of players how advanced modeling can solve some of the most complex challenges facing the AEC industry.

Tweet: @treiemme is teaching players how 3D modeling can solve the complex challenges facing the #AEC industry @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/UOVub+Click to tweet: “@treiemme is teaching players how 3D modeling
can solve the complex challenges facing the #AEC industry”

Tech-Created Challenges

Many of these challenges are created by the technology tools used most widely today.

For example, on the project management side, one of the greatest problems Occhipinti sees is the fragmentation among systems.

"Every single department is on its own system," he explains. "There is no integration among planning, procurement, etc., and everything is spread out on a thousand different documents that are really not connected at all."

This fragmentation leads to problems in communication, errors and emailed updates that are outdated almost before they are sent.

Then, there are issues of scalability.

Many façade contractors already are using 3D technologies. The challenge, however, is finding a scalable solution that allows them to grow their business beyond one scope. Products suitable for coordinating the sizing of 300,000 cladding panels haven't always been able to handle the highly detailed engineering of smaller components — or smoothly interface among these details.

3-im, a Dassault Systèmes partner, has heard time and again the surprise of clients who realize a solution already exists that can improve coordination among trades and components.

A New 3D Market

That surprise often comes because the Italian industry is relatively new to 3D design possibilities.

The country is home to some of the strongest construction companies in the world, particularly in the field of infrastructure. Many of these players have branched out worldwide and have led to the rise of smaller supporting players.

The painful irony, however, is that many of these companies are struggling in the regional market, even as they grow internationally, due to the ongoing economic crisis inn which Italy is mired.

It's within this unique contradiction that Italian contractors are beginning to ask about 3D technology. Occhipinti notes that as a result of these economic forces, Italy has been moving much slower than some of the Northern European countries into its use of technology tools.

"What we're seeing is these companies that are now technically very strong, but technologically very weak," Occhipinti says.

That is about to change.

A Partner in the Process

Because many of these contractors have offices around the world, these Italian companies are comparing their capabilities to joint venture partners that are prepared to bid on projects requiring 3D delivery.

This recognition is leading many regional projects to seek out partners such as 3-im.

"They are looking at partners in Italy and thinking 'if I want to get more competitive abroad, where my main market is, I need to be able to compete with the others and bring myself to another level. How do I do that?'" Occhipinti has found.

It's a question that 3-im is well suited to answer. The company is made up of Italians whose careers have been built on technologically complex projects entirely outside of Italy. Since arriving in Italy in 2013, the company has established work with several major contractors, and is setting out to wow the rest by way of example.

A Complex Example

Among those examples is 3-im's current work with Morphosis Architects on the San Donato Milanese headquarters of Eni S.p.A., the Italian oil company with worldwide operations.

05.CDE_02 (1)

The 117 million EUR complex will feature three buildings covering 120,000 square meters. Each building will be connected by various platforms. The double-skin façade is designed with a level of geometric complexity that made 3D design a near necessity.

Tweet: The geometric complexity behind this €117M, 120K-sq-meter complex made 3D design a necessity @treiemme @Dassault3DS http://ctt.ec/3SL01+Click to tweet: “The geometric complexity behind this €117M,
120K-sq-meter complex made 3D design a necessity”

During its design development, Eni decided to implement a BIM process for the design allotment, construction documents and tendering process. "It was looking for a partner that had the experience to run this particular process," Occhipinti said.

At the start of this project, 3-im found a partner in Dassault Systèmes, finding the company's 3D technology the perfect product for defining the scale and complexity of the Eni project.

For nine months, 3-im experts have worked to build a dense 3D model for the project, bringing it to LOD 350, which not only represents the shapes and sizes of specific object, but also the interfaces among building systems.

05.CDE_01.000

Occhipinti explains that using 3D helped ease three key areas:

  • Coordination of systems: 3D allowed 3-im to model the work of the different trades that would be involved. Occhipinti notes that many basic 3D programs would not have been enough to handle this coordination — because of the changes that were happening on an almost daily basis.
  • Geometric complexity: The double-skin can be complex to fabricate on its own, but this one employs some fairly unique geometry. In addition, each entry is made up of a double-curvature glass reinforced concrete panel that will ultimately be carved one by one due to their individual designs.
  • Data structure: The model was structured so that all of the necessary materials and specifications, and all of their information and features, was included and could be effectively pulled out of the model as needed. This not only proved helpful with scheduling, but with cost control.

A Fresh Opportunity

Despite the challenges facing Italian design and construction companies, and their partners around the world, Occhipinti sees major opportunities.

"We are living in an extremely complex moment where the global economy is shifting from one phase to the next, and this shift is a great opportunity for every industry to think about itself and propose new ways of improving processes," he says.

As he points out, the construction industry is infamous for its inefficiency, so at this point there are no wrong answers — except for maintaining the status quo.

"Things like this don't happen quickly," Occhipinti adds. "When I started in this industry more than ten years ago, people were saying 'in five years BIM is going to be standard.' Five years later we heard the same thing. Things take time to change — and that's good for us. We have the time to bring new value to the market."

 

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Akio Moriwaki

Akio Moriwaki
Dassault Systèmes' head of global marketing for the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industry, Mr. Moriwaki led the launch of the groundbreaking Lean Construction Solution Experience and is a member of buildingSMART.


Related Resources:

White paper: Technological Change Brought by BIM to Façade Design

Collaborative and Industrialized Construction 

Façade Design for Fabrication  Industry Solution Experience